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On the other hand, I’m mindful of the fact that when RBS needed to be bailed out, membership of the union saved us from economic catastrophe and I worry about whether North Sea oil can, as we are told by the ‘Yes’ campaign, sustain and even improve Scotland’s standard of living.

Some of the most pro-independence people I know think that Scotland need not be afraid of going it alone, because it will excel no matter what.

My hesitance at embracing independence has nothing to do with lack of belief in Scotland’s remarkable people or its achievements.

The simple truth is that Scotland is subject to the same twenty-first century pressures as the rest of the world.

Of course, some will say that worrying about our economic prospects is poor-spirited, because those people take the view ‘I’ll be skint if I want to and Westminster can’t tell me otherwise’.

I’m afraid that’s a form of ‘patriotism’ that I will never understand.

However, when people try to make this debate about the purity of your lineage, things start getting a little Death Eaterish for my taste.I came to the question of independence with an open mind and an awareness of the seriousness of what we are being asked to decide.This is not a general election, after which we can curse the result, bide our time and hope to get a better result in four years.This view is also taken by the independent study ‘Scotland’s Choices: The Referendum and What Happens Afterwards’ by Iain Mc Lean, Jim Gallagher and Guy Lodge, which says that ‘it would be a foolish Scottish government that planned future public expenditure on the basis of current tax receipts from North Sea oil and gas’.My fears about the economy extend into an area in which I have a very personal interest: Scottish medical research.

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